My Understanding of Truth
"The knight of knowledge must be able not only to love his enemies, but also to hate his friends."
Friedrich Nietzsche, Ecce Homo
The truth is indifferent, it does not care about our preferences, our histories, or what we view to be 'higher values.' Though, as the existence of truth is a fact that some would rather not accept ― even though any statement that denies the existence of truth cannot be true even by its own rationale, but I digress ― it seems that displaying proof of truth may necessary before I can continue this writing. Paul Cooijmans,
If absolute truth does not exist, the claim "Absolute truth does not exist" is not absolutely true either.
What we see here, is that at a minimum, what is true is real, and what is real, at the very least, must make sense. I've italicized "must make sense" because often times claims that are verifiably senseless ― that is to say, so illogical or contradictory that the fact that they are false is readily observable ― are treated as though they are true, even though they are not. Often times this is done because one believes in experiential, or faulty conceptions of metaphorical truths.
Next I will address the former.
The general claim put forth by the belief in experiential truths is that "what one experiences as true, is true." This claim is false because if you accept that this argument exists ― which you must to develop a counter argument to it ― then you must accept that there can be contradictory experiences. So either you've somehow written this article and changed your mind regarding what it proposes, or someone other than you has written it and experiences truth different you do ― and in both cases there exists experiences of truth that contradict one another. So, "truth as experience" would be a definition of truth that is contradictory, and senseless, if it so what is written here does, in fact, exists.
Now on to faulty conceptions of metaphorical truth.
To be continued...

Text Author: Antjuan Finch


Published: November 1st, 2018


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